Author Archives: admin

pRDM and vRDM to VMDK Migrations

I was assisting an amazing client in moving some VMs off an older storage array and onto a newer storage platform. They had some VMs that had Physical RDMs (pRDM) attached to the VMs, and we wanted them living as VMDKs on the new SAN.
Traditionally, I have always shutdown the VM, remove the pRDM, re-add with vRDM, and then do the migration, but found an awesome write-up on a few separate ways in doing this.
(Credit of the following content goes to Cormac Hogan of VMware)

VM with Physical (Pass-Thru) RDMs (Powered On – Storage vMotion):

  • If I try to change the format to thin or thick, then no Storage vMotion allowed.
  • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the pRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN.

 

VM with Virtual (non Pass-Thru) RDMs (Power On – Storage vMotion):

  • On a migrate, if I chose to covert the format in the advanced view, the vRDM is converted to a VMDK on the destination VMFS datastore.
  • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the vRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN (same behaviour as pRDM)

 

VM with Physical (Pass-Thru) RDMs (Powered Off – Cold Migration):

  • On a migrate, if I chose to change the format (via the advanced view), the pRDM is converted to a VMDKon the destination VMFS datastore.
  • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the pRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN

 

VM with Virtual (non Pass-Thru) RDMs (Power Off – Cold Migration):

  • On a migrate, if I chose to covert the format in the advanced view, the vRDM is converted to a VMDK on the destination VMFS datastore.
  • If I chose not to do any conversion, only the vRDM mapping file is moved from the source VMFS datastore to the destination VMFS datastore – the data stays on the original LUN (same behaviour as pRDM).

Windows Defender Error “Unexpected error. Sorry, we ran into a problem. Please try again”

Since the latest Windows 10 Creators Update, I have been seeing some issue with Windows Defender alerting me that it cannot start. When I try to start the service, I get the following error:

Unexpected error. Sorry, we ran into a problem. Please try again

 

The trick was to edit some registry settings (of course).Open Registry Editor and go to:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows Defender

Change DisableAntiSpyware and DisableAntiVirus values from 1 to 0

Coincidentally, I didn’t have an entry for DisableAntiVirus and had to create it

 

Update Plex Plugin on FreeNAS 11

If you are rocking your own FreeNAS storage at home or office, you’ll know that FreeNAS’ built-in plugins are hardly up to date. Updating the Plex plugin is fairly straightforward.

1. SSH to your FreeNAS
2. type: jls
3. Take the note of the Jail # of your Plex plugin
4. type:  jexec # csh (where # is the number of the jail noted in last step)
5. type:  fetch -o PMS_Updater.sh https://raw.githubusercontent.com/mstinaff/PMS_Updater/master/PMS_Updater.sh
5. type:  chmod 755 PMS_Updater.sh
6. type:  ./PMS_Updater.sh -u PlexPass_User -p PlexPass_password -a

 

vSphere Web Client Integration Plugin Not Working

When trying to manage your vSphere environment using the web client (or forced to in 6.5+), the Web Client Integration plugin is required to make use of many features the web client has to offer, like remote console, enhanced authentication, and deploying OVF appliances.

If you have downloaded and installed the plugin, but IE, Chrome, or Firefox do not activate the plugin, it can most likely be resolved by doing one of the following:

  1. Add the vCenter FQDN to the trusted site list:
    For vSphere 6.0-6.5: https://vCenter_FQDN
    For vSphere 5.5: https://vCenter_FQDN:9443
  2. Add the vCenter FQDN to the Local Intranet list (IE & Chrome)
  3. Uninstall Plugin, Clear Cache/Cookies, Reinstall Plugin, and Repeat option 1

 

How to find HPE Proliant Serial Number from Command Prompt

I was trying to find a serial number for an HP (HPE) Proliant Server, and the System Management Agent wasn’t displaying the info and I didn’t have access to the iLO. I found the following workaround from a user on a forum.

Open a commands prompt and type:

wmic /node:%computername% bios get serialnumber

To find the Serial of a remote computer, type the following:

wmic /node:HOSTNAME bios get serialnumber

 

HPE Proliant G7 Servers and vSphere 6.5 Purple Screen of Death

Upgrading VMware to ESXi 6.5 on HP G7 Servers will crash and cause you to scream and will require you to waste your time building a custom ISO that HPE could have easily done.
Best practice is to use the vendor’s custom ISO’s that have the hardware drivers integrated, so I used HPE’s latest Custom ISO.

HPE G7 Server support is being dropped by both HPE and VMware. In fact, vSphere 6.5 is supposedly the last version that will support the G7s. Knowing this info, I assumed upgrading from ESXi 6.0 to 6.5 on G7 would work, but I found out quickly that after the upgrade the hosts would “Purple Screen of Death” (PSOD) right after boot.

The Error: “PF Exception 14 in world 67667:sfcb-smx IP 0x0 addr 0x0″

The Issue: There are incompatible driver(s) in the customized ISO from HPE. Yes, there are more than one driver with issues.

The Workarounds: There are various workarounds that I have personally found to work, while others have been resolutions I have read about after I dealt with this, so I was not able to verify that they do indeed work, but I will list them nevertheless. Upgrading the firmware, BIOS, etc did not resolve the issue.
Note: All these workaround require a fresh install of ESXi. Running an Upgrade does not remove the incompatible drivers, and the host doesn’t stay alive long enough before crashing to manually remove them via SSH.

Solution 1: Use VMware’s Standard ISO Media
While this goes against many best practices, VMware doesnt offer too many vendor drivers in their ISO builds, so the offending drivers do not get installed and crash the system. While you can certainly use this method, you will want to follow-up and manually install the appropriate driver VIBs from HPE.

Solution 2: Build your own Custom ISO
This takes a bit more work, but is probably the most comprehensive path to resolution. You will basically need to remove drivers from the HPE Customized 6.5 ISO and inject those from the 6.0 ISO. The following are instructions on doing this.

Create Custom VMware ESXi Media

Prerequisites:

Instructions:

  • Launch vSphere PowerCLI

  • Add the HP ESXi 6.5 image bundle
    Add-EsxSoftwareDepot -DepotUrl C:\ESXi\HPE-6_5.zip

  • Check the Profile
    Get-EsxImageProfile

  • Copy the Profile
    New-EsxImageProfile -CloneProfile HPE-ESXi-6.5.0-OS-Release-6* -Name “G7-ESXi”


    Use “HPE Custom” for Vendor

  • Check the Profile
    Get-EsxImageProfile

  • Remove the driver from the image
    Remove-EsxSoftwarePackage G7-ESXi hpe-smx-provider

  • Add the HP ESXi 6.0 image bundle
    Add-EsxSoftwareDepot -DepotUrl C:\ESXi\HPE-6_0.zip
  • Check the Profile
    Get-EsxImageProfile

  • View both drivers in the two bundles
    Get-EsxSoftwarePackage | findstr smx

  • Add the necessary driver into the custom build
    add-esxsoftwarepackage -imageprofile G7-ESXi -softwarepackage “hpe-smx-provider 600.03.11.00.9-2768847”

  • Convert your custom bundle to ISO
    Export-EsxImageProfile -ImageProfile G7-ESXi -ExportToIso -filepath “C:\ESXi\G7-ESXi.iso”

  • Now take that ISO file that was created and use it to do a FRESH INSTALL. (Remember, upgrade will not work).

Find Unknown Wireless Password for Aruba Wireless SSID

If you don’t remember what password you or another Administrator set for a particular SSID on an Aruba Wireless Access Controller (or Instant Access Point), you can find this by connecting to any Access Point via SSH, Telnet or Console, and running the following commands:

show run no-encrypt

Scroll up until you get to the wlan ssid-profile section, and the password will be listed next to wpa-passphrase

If you had just ran a show run without the “no-encrypt“, you would have see a random hash like this: